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TOPIC: Propane Sensor Power
#2552
Garrett (User)
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Propane Sensor Power 2 Years, 3 Months ago Karma: 3  
Does anyone know how the stove's propane control/alarm is wired?

I removed the solenoid thinking I'd have to replace it - I didn't - and when I put everything back together again, there is no power at the control box.

TIA, Garrett
 
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#2573
Tugtardis (User)
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Gender: Male Location: Eustis - near Orlando FL Birthdate: 1955-04-11
Re:Propane Sensor Power 2 Years, 3 Months ago Karma: 4  
Garrett, this'll be working now - I belatedly saw your earlier post about the lack of power to the Bilge Pumps. You'll have turned-on the 'Constant Power' breaker by now ??

From the 'Owner Experiences v1.7', Electrical section page 6-3:
quote

Selector switches
These are under the pilot house seat. They are Blue Seas switches. The exact model has changed on later boats, but the functions are:
• Rotary switch for the Engine Start Battery. Should be left ON to start the engine, or operate the windless or thruster. This is the forward-most rotary switch on our boat.
• DC Main 100AMP Circuit Breaker for all the House power– feeds electrical panel and all breakers on DC side. Should be left ON to operate any 12V circuit. I think this has been replaced with a rotary switch on later boats.
• Emergency Parallel rotary emergency combiner switch. Manually connects the engine and house batteries together. Should be left OFF.
• ‘Always-on’ circuits – a 30A circuit breaker that feeds bilge pumps, propane detector, CO detector and tank level gauges. This connects directly to the house battery, bypassing the other circuit breakers. Should always be left ON at all times.

end-quote

Jeremy
 
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#2575
Garrett (User)
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Re:Propane Sensor Power 2 Years, 3 Months ago Karma: 3  
Thanks, Jeremy

I was hoping that would be the case, but after ensuring the bilge pumps were back on line, I took a quick look as I was leaving for an appointment, and couldn't see power (LED's) at the CO detector/propane solenoid switch.

I have pulled the slug out of the solenoid in order to by-pass it, but I can't see how that would affect the electrical connection. I'll go back in the morning and be more thorough.

Cheers, Garrett
 
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#2577
Tugtardis (User)
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Re:Propane Sensor Power 2 Years, 3 Months ago Karma: 4  
Garrett,
I've been offline a while, and catching-up now I'm back aboard.
I saw in another post that your propane installation is 'aftermarket' ??
If so, all bets are off - I was describing the Tomco factory-installed propane sensor/solenoid wiring....
On my boat that is a Xintex S-2A combined sensor/solenoid on the side of the counter just inside the rear door, stbd side.

My guess is some lazy aftermarket installer tapped into a convenient 12V lighting circuit. Kurt Dilworth would have his balls for bookends if he saw that....
 
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#2609
Garrett (User)
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Re:Propane Sensor Power - Solved & NB Note 2 Years, 3 Months ago Karma: 3  
I phoned Trident Marine, distributors of the propane controller/sensor, who confirmed there is a fuse in the circuit, and kindly emailed the installation instructions and wiring diagram. With that in hand I was able to trace the wiring back to the battery rotary switch on the side of the helm seat, and found the fuse holder. It had blown and after replacement the system came alive again. I then reassembled the solenoid, i.e. put the spring, slug, and seat back in (without which the solenoid is by-passed so the stove can be operated by manually turning the tank on as with a BBQ) turned the controller and stove on and got a flame. Happy ending to a real nuisance.

BTW, before this particular little drama unfolded, I almost burned my fingers when I touched the solenoid in the propane locker. It was so hot I thought it was defective, but FYI, Trident says that's normal.

Cheers, Garrett
 
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